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Science

           Mrs C Dunn
         Science Leader

A high-quality science education provides the foundations for understanding the world through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics.  Science has changed our lives and is vital to the world’s future prosperity, and all pupils should be taught essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science.  Through building up a body of key foundational knowledge and concepts, pupils should be encouraged to recognise the power of rational explanation and develop a sense of excitement and curiosity about natural phenomena.  They should be encouraged to understand how science can be used to explain what is occurring, predict how things will behave, and analyse causes.

The national curriculum for science aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics
  • develop understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them
  • are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future.
  • different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them
  • are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future.

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At Lytchett Matravers we are proud to be involved in the Thinking, Doing, Talking Science  research programme.

It’s stated aims are; 

To enhance participating teachers’ skills to:

  • improve the level of conceptual challenge in primary science by the encouragement of pupils’ higher order thinking.
  • make links between pupils’ learning in Science, Mathematics and English and so to increase the cognitive challenge throughout the curriculum.

We are aiming to achieve this through:

  • Questioning skills to extend pupils’ thinking about scientific ideas.
  • Pupils’ focused and creative classroom recording in science.
  • Understanding of appropriate and challenging science practical work, including investigations and problem solving.
  • Teachers’ personal Science subject knowledge links to Maths & English.

 

In Year 5, we are developing the children’s thinking skills by asking them     "The Big Question":

What causes gravity?

‘Pencils produce gravity but not enough to attract anything.’

‘If you push the two books out in a space craft, in a few days they would               gradually pull together…where there’s no friction.’

 ‘The core is like a big magnet.’  

‘Is it because the world is spinning?’

‘It’s a force that pulls things to the centre of the earth.’

‘It makes things fall’

‘It causes the tide to come in.’

‘I think it’s a force that grows in outer space and it picks up rubble and pulls it together.’

 

You can download our Curriculum Map for all subjects by clicking on the document below. This document clearly outlines the key learning objectives for Science in every year group.

Over the last term, Y6 have completed several investigations involving electricity and light.  The children have been learning how to write up a scientific enquiry complete with a prediction, method, fair test, recording results and writing a conclusion.  Have a look at some of our photos:

 

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