Skip to content ↓

Science

           Mrs C Dunn
         Science Leader

A high-quality science education provides the foundations for understanding the world through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics.  Science has changed our lives and is vital to the world’s future prosperity, and all pupils should be taught essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science.  Through building up a body of key foundational knowledge and concepts, pupils should be encouraged to recognise the power of rational explanation and develop a sense of excitement and curiosity about natural phenomena.  They should be encouraged to understand how science can be used to explain what is occurring, predict how things will behave, and analyse causes.

The national curriculum for science aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics
  • develop understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them
  • are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future.
  • different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them
  • are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future.

http://www.southampton.ac.uk/assets/imported/transforms/content-block/CB_RImg/E051D31E0C6D40D1A5891FFE78FB003B/TDTS_ID_Horizontal_FullCol.jpg_SIA_JPG_fit_to_width_INLINE.jpg

At Lytchett Matravers we are proud to be involved in the Thinking, Doing, Talking Science  research programme.

It’s stated aims are; 

To enhance participating teachers’ skills to:

  • improve the level of conceptual challenge in primary science by the encouragement of pupils’ higher order thinking.
  • make links between pupils’ learning in Science, Mathematics and English and so to increase the cognitive challenge throughout the curriculum.

We are aiming to achieve this through:

  • Questioning skills to extend pupils’ thinking about scientific ideas.
  • Pupils’ focused and creative classroom recording in science.
  • Understanding of appropriate and challenging science practical work, including investigations and problem solving.
  • Teachers’ personal Science subject knowledge links to Maths & English.

Year 4 programme of Study

 

Living things and their habitats

  • Pupils should be taught to:
  •  recognise that living things can be grouped in a variety of ways
  • explore and use classification keys to help group, identify and name a variety of living things in their local and wider environment
  • recognise that environments can change and that this can sometimes pose dangers to living things.

 

Animals, including humans

Pupils should be taught to:

  • describe the simple functions of the basic parts of the digestive system in humans
  • identify the different types of teeth in humans and their simple functions
  • Construct and interpret a variety of food chains, identifying producers, predators and prey.

 

States of Matter

Pupils should be taught to:

  • compare and group materials together, according to whether they are solids, liquids or gases
  • observe that some materials change state when they are heated or cooled, and measure or research the temperature at which this happens in degrees Celsius (°C)
  • identify the part played by evaporation and condensation in the water cycle and associate the rate of evaporation with temperature.

Sound

Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify how sounds are made, associating some of them with something vibrating
  • recognise that vibrations from sounds travel through a medium to the ear
  • find patterns between the pitch of a sound and features of the object that produced it
  • find patterns between the volume of a sound and the strength of the vibrations that produced it
  • recognise that sounds get fainter as the distance from the sound source increases.

Electricity

Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify common appliances that run on electricity
  • construct a simple series electrical circuit, identifying and naming its basic parts, including cells, wires, bulbs, switches and buzzers
  • identify whether or not a lamp will light in a simple series circuit, based on whether or not the lamp is part of a complete loop with a battery
  • recognise that a switch opens and closes a circuit and associate this with whether or not a lamp lights in a simple series circuit
  • recognise some common conductors and insulators, and associate metals with being good conductors